First Aid for children and babies

As a parent and a health professional I cannot express enough the importance of First Aid Training.

Being a new parent is always a daunting experience. Anything that will make our lives easier and safer, us parents will snap up! Bottle prep machines, bath thermometers, monitors with a screen, walkers you name it we’ll buy it! Not all of it we actually need, we are just led to believe that do. But when it comes to First Aid and resuscitation these are essential skills that could potentially save your son or daughters life?

There is increasing awareness of the importance of learning these key first aid skills. So book onto a course, encourage those who are also responsible for the care of your child to book onto a course. Why not book a group course for you and your mummy and daddy friends. Once completed the skills learned will give you the confidence to react in an urgent/emergency situation.

Hopefully you will never need to use CPR or perform chest thrusts. For that reason it is recommended that you refresh your memory and attend a course periodically, whether thats yearly or every few years. At the very least watch some you tube videos posted by reputable organisations such as British Red Cross, St. Johns ambulance or Millies Trust.

Here is some simple information. Please note a baby is regarded as those under 1 year old and a child those over 1 year old up to puberty. For more information see the links below.

A choking baby

  1. Give up to five back blows. Hold the baby face down along your thigh with their head lower than their bottom. Hit them firmly on their back between the shoulder blades up to five times. If back blows do not dislodge the object, move on to step two.
  2. Give up to five chest thrusts. Turn the baby over so they are facing upwards and place two fingers in the middle of their chest just below the nipples. Push sharply downwards up to five times.
  3. If the item is not dislodged, call 999 and continue with step 1.

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

An unresponsive but breathing baby

  1. Check for breathing. Tilt their head back and look and feel for breaths. If they are breathing, move on to step two.
  2. Hold the baby on their side with their head slightly tilted back, supported and lower than their bottom.
  3. Call 999.

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

An unresponsive baby that is NOT breathing

  1. Check for breathing. Tilt their head back and look and feel for breaths. If they are not breathing, move on to step two.
  2. Ask someone to call 999.
  3. Give five rescue breaths. Tilt their head back, seal your mouth over their mouth and nose and blow five times into the baby.
  4. Give 30 chest compressions. Push firmly in the middle of their chest with two fingers so that the chest goes inward, then release.
  5. Give two rescue breaths, then continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until help arrives.

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

A choking child

  1. Give up to five back blows. Hit them firmly on their back between the shoulder blades. If back blows do not dislodge the object, move on to step two.
  2. Give up to five abdominal thrusts. Hold the child around the waist and pull inwards and upwards above their belly button.
  3. If the item is not dislodged, call 999 and continue with step 1.

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

 

An unresponsive but breathing child

  1. Check for breathing. Tilt their head back and look and feel for breaths. If they are breathing, move on to step two.
  2. Move them onto their side and tilt their head back.
  3. Call 999

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

 

An unresponsive child that is NOT breathing

  1. Check for breathing. Tilt their head back and look and feel for breaths. If they are not breathing, move on to step two.
  2. Call 999
  3. Give five rescue breaths. Tilt their head back, seal your mouth over their mouth and pinch their nose. Blow five times into the child.
  4. Give 30 chest compressions. Push firmly in the middle of their chest with one hand so the chest goes inward, then release.
  5. Give two rescue breaths, then continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until help arrives.

Watch the video courtesy of British Red Cross

First Aid information links

British Red Cross

NHS Pregnancy and Baby 

St. John’s Ambulance

Millies Trust

 

First Aid courses links

Red Cross First Aid training

Millies Trust First Aid courses

 

1 COMMENT

  1. Really useful information. I did a short course within a postnatal group, its scary stuff but I think every parent or adult responsible for the care of a child should learn the skills.

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